Wakeah by Cara Romero

‘Wakeah’ by Cara Romero

£350.00

Title: Wakeah
artist: Cara Romero
UK signed limited edition of 10
paper size: 52cm x 43cm
image size: 48.5cm x 36.3m

‘Wakeah’ is also available in a large scale framed image (101cm x 80cm, UK edition of five), please contact the gallery for details.

In this fine art photographic portrait of Wakeah, Cara Romero is showing us how the “Indian” doll she longed for as a child would look. Comanche Woman Wakeah is photographed in a life size doll box, wearing full powwow dance regalia, surrounded by her accessories. This portrait celebrates the dignity, grace and glamour of the women that young Cara admired at the powows.

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Wakeah by Cara Romero

Title: Wakeah
artist: Cara Romero
UK signed limited edition of 10
paper size: 52cm x 43cm
image size: 48.5cm x 36.3m

‘Wakeah’ is also available in a large scale framed image (101cm x 80cm, UK edition of five), please contact the gallery for details.

In this fine art photographic portrait of Wakeah, Cara Romero is showing us how the “Indian” doll she longed for as a child would look. Comanche woman Wakeah is photographed in a life size doll box, wearing full powwow dance regalia, surrounded by her accessories. This portrait celebrates the dignity, grace and glamour of the women that young Cara admired at the powows.

 

From a very young age, Chemehuevi women are taught that their innate strength as a woman and life giver is all-powerful, maybe sometimes even supernatural, and we are respected as equals in Chemehuevi society. We hold power in government and historically in battle. This unique perspective shows up throughout my art. It is always my intention to visualize this inherent Chemehuevi belief in the all- powerful, supernatural strength of women. It is a gentle but powerful shift to see Native women portrayed in this way from an indigenous female perspective.

I am deeply committed to making work that addresses Native American social issues and changes the way people perceive Native Americans, especially Native women, in contemporary society. If we want respect, love and beauty among us and others, we must actively promote it through our art.” CR

Cara Romero

Cara Romero is a fine art photographer whose work reflects a diverse training in film, digital, fine art, journalism, editorial portraiture and commercial photography. Cara has won several awards including ribbons at major art markets and the “Visions for the Future” award from the Native American Rights Fund. Raised on the Chemehuevi Valley Indian reservation along the California shoreline of Havasu Lake in the heart of the Mojave Desert, she now lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico with her husband celebrated Cochiti potter Diego Romero and their children.

Cara Romero is a born visual storyteller with a distinctive lens shaped by years of study, a visceral Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultural memory, collective history, her own personal experience and a compassionate and keen sense of visual narrativity. Romero is the proud mother of two boys, Paris and Noel, the wife of the dynamic and highly regarded contemporary Pueblo artist Diego Romero, and the daughter of a Chemehuevi father and a German-Irish mother. Romero studied photography at both the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico and Oklahoma State University and studied cultural anthropology at the University of Houston.

Her photography – a mélange of fine art and documentary-style – is a sometimes whimsical, often complex interplay of social commentary, adaptation and examination of modern culture with a distinctly modern Indigenous world view. It is multi-layered, meant to be experienced from a multi-verse of perspectives and invites viewers – mainstream and connoisseurs of Indian art alike – to enter into its nuanced visual architecture with an open mind, and a willingness to abandon pre-conceived notions about Native art, culture, and peoples.

“Native American art is as diverse as our people. Photography is a newly emerging art form for contemporary Native American artists who are creating groundbreaking, heart clenching work from deep inside our indigenous identities, cultures and landscapes.” CR

‘Wakeah’ is included in our exhibition ‘We Are Native Women, 2017.

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